Progress Report 2008-2012

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International GNSS Service Progress Report 2008-2012

You can download a PDF of the entire report here. 

Editor: IGS Central Bureau

Contact Information

IGS Central Bureau
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
California Institute of Technology
M/S 238-540
4800 Oak Grove Road
Pasadena, California 91101
United States of America
www.igs.org | cb@igs.org

 The IGS is a service of

Global Geodetic Observing System
International Association of Geodesy
International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics
International Council for Science - World Data System

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

 

Contents

Summary
Introduction
Strategic Plan: Goals and Objectives
Achievements 2008-2012
Progress on Defined Actions
Impact of IGS Activities
Effectiveness in Achieving Goals and Objectives
Conclusions
Appendix 1 - Summary of progress on defined actions
Appendix 2 - Achievement Impact Analysis
Appendix 3 - IGS Element Impact Analysis

 

Mission 

The IGS mission is to provide the highest-quality GNSS data, products, and services in support of the terrestrial reference frame, Earth observations and research, Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT), and other applications that benefit the scientific community and society.

 

Summary & Introduction

Summary

The International GNSS Service (IGS) conducted an evaluation of progress made in achieving the goals and objectives outlined in the IGS 2008-2012 Strategic Plan. This report concludes that significant progress has been made in areas highly relevant to organizational goals.  A summary of the analysis is included herein.

Introduction

The International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), which is a member association of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG).  It is also a service of the World Data System of the International Council for Science (ICSU/WDS).

The IGS is a federation of over 216 organizations from around the world.  This federation pools its resources to operate a cooperative global infrastructure that provides high quality Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data products to support high accuracy positioning, navigation and timing applications.   This IGS product suite enables access to the definitive global reference frame for scientific, educational, and commercial applications.

The IGS carries out its mission through a network of GNSS Tracking Stations, Data Centers and Analysis Centers that are operated cooperatively by participants around the world. The IGS is governed by an international Governing Board that is elected by Associate Members, the principal participants of the IGS. Executive management of the IGS is carried out by the Central Bureau, as is coordination of the IGS Tracking Network and management of the IGS web portal that provides centralized access to IGS products and information.  IGS products are generated by combining results from the different Analysis Centers under the direction of the Analysis Center Coordinator (ACC) and specific product coordinators.  Introduction of new products and specific technical issues are addressed through Pilot Projects and Working Groups of technical experts.

IGS data products are openly available to all users.  They include GNSS satellite ephemerides, Earth rotation parameters, global tracking station coordinates and velocities, satellite and tracking station clock information, differential code biases for satellites and receivers, zenith troposphere path delay estimates, and global ionosphere information.  These products contribute to the realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) to which all Earth observations are referenced, and are used in monitoring Earth orientation parameters that are used for relating terrestrial and celestial coordinate systems.

The 2008-2012 Strategic Plan and IGS Technical Reports are available online at www.IGS.org

Impacts and Social Benefits

The IGS impacts are measured in terms of societal benefit.  By fulfilling its mission to provide the highest quality GNSS data products, the IGS enables broad applications that enhance our understanding of the Earth, improve safety, and promote efficiency.

To facilitate the analysis of IGS progress, this report reorganizes goals and strategies that were defined in the 2008-2012 Strategic Plan into a concise set of goals and objectives shown in Table 1 and described below.

Strategic Plan: Goals and Objectives

[Table 1: IGS Goals and Objectives]

Goal 1 (World Standard): Serve as the premier source of high-quality GNSS data, products and standards, freely available to all user communities.

  • Objective 1.1 (Ensure/Increase quality): Ensure that the quality of GNSS data, products, and services meet or exceed the present technical quality standards and that the accuracy of the IGS products continues to be improved.
  • Objective 1.2 (Meet New User Needs): Incorporate and integrate new systems, technologies, applications, and changing user needs into IGS products and services.
  • Objective 1.3 (IGS/GNSS Integration): Facilitate the integration of IGS into the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) and other broadly based Earth-observing and global navigation systems and services.
  • Objective 1.4 (GNSS Standards): Establish, evolve and disseminate GNSS world standards.
  • Objective 1.5 (Customers): Increase user footprint and customer satisfaction.

Goal 2 (GNSS Expertise and Policy Advisory Role): Promote the value and benefit of IGS to society, the broader scientific community, and in particular to policy makers and funding entities.

  • Objective 2.1 (Technical Expertise): Maintain and increase the technical expertise in all areas of IGS. 
  • Objective 2.2 (Policy Making): Maintain and increase IGS presence in policy-making entities.

Goal 3 (Governance and Funding Development): The IGS will maintain and improve the efficiency of its governance and management to support the goals set forth in this strategic plan.  This includes the development of funding to support the year-to-year implementation of this plan.

  • Objective 3.1 (Best Practices): IGS will continue to incorporate best practices to maintain and improve its efficiency.
  • Objective 3.2 (Funding): IGS will increase its funding year-to-year and the diversity of its funding sources.

 

Achievements

The IGS has made many significant achievements during the 2008-2012 timeframe. These represent the products of the actions in which the IGS has engaged in support of its goals and objectives.  Many of the most important achievements are listed in Table 2 and are highlighted in the following pages. 

[Table 2: IGS Achievements 2008-2012]

2008   IGS Workshop, Miami, USA
2008   New Analysis Center GRGS, Toulouse, France
2008   Bias and Calibration Working Group established
2008   Antenna Working Group established
2008   ACC2.0 Next Generation Combination Software call issued
2008   Governing Board begins annual Strategic Implementation Plan process
2008   Third meeting of the International Committee on GNSS (ICG) hosted by IGS CB
2008   Infrastructure Committee formed
2008   IGS Institute formed

2009   First Official IGS Reprocessed results (Repro1) provided to IERS
2009   IGS co-chairs ICG WG on Reference Frame, Timing and Applications
2009   IGS becomes RTCM SC104 voting member
2009   IGS Institute Public Benefit Corporation status approved by US IRS

2010   IGS Workshop, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
2010   TIGA Pilot Project transition into TIGA Working Group
2010   Space Vehicle Orbit Dynamics Working Group formed
2010   IGS Associates Committee formed/Member selection process reviewed
2010   IGS Terms of Reference revised
2010   IERS releases ITRF2008 with significant input from IGS

2011   Multi-GNSS Global Experiment initiated (M-GEX)
2011   First Reprocessing Campaign finalized (Repro1)
2011   Migration of IGS Time Scale generation to version 2.0 algorithm
2011   IGS08 Reference Frame introduced
2011   New antenna model introduced (igs08.atx)
2011   Uncalibrated Radome Experiment initiated
2011   Technical Report process re-introduced by AIUB

2012   IGS Workshop on GNSS Biases, Bern, Switzerland
2012   RINEX Working Group formed
2012   New Analysis Center, Wuhan University, China
2012   All Working Group Charters and memberships reviewed
2012   IGS Workshop, Olsztyn, Poland
2012   New Site Guidelines adopted
2012   Preparations for introduction of IGS Real-time Service in progress
2012   Second Reprocessing Campaign initiated (Repro2)
2012   ACC2.0 development plan formed
2012   IGS co-chairs IGMAS task force within ICG

 

Core Product Quality:

The IGS Analysis Centers have continued to improve product precision and consistency.  IGS “final” orbits now agree at a level of approximately 2 cm, and final satellite clock solutions agree at approximately 75 ps RMS with 20 ps standard deviation.  The final X- and Y-pole solutions agree at approximately 0.03 mas, and the final length of day solutions agree at approximately 0.01 µs.  See: http://www.igs.org/products.

Principal objective supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality.

Tracking Network:

The IGS network has expanded from 410 to 440 stations since 2008.  Many stations have been upgraded to support multiple GNSSs.  The number of stations delivering real-time streamed data to IGS has increased from approximately 40 in 2008 to 188 currently, though many of these are being provided on an experimental basis and have not yet been fully integrated within the network.  Issues with the decay of available reference frame stations have been partially addressed by the Reference Frame Working Group and Infrastructure Committee.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O1.5 Increase customer footprint.

IGS08 Reference Frame: 

The IGS has adopted the new IGS08 reference frame, which is closely related to ITRF2008.  IGS08 is based on a selected globally distributed subset of 232 well-performing ITRF2008 ground stations.  Details relating to IGS08 are contained in IGSMAIL-6354.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards.

Antenna Calibration Model:

The IGS has formed an Antenna Working Group to focus on antenna calibration issues. Coincident with the IGS08 Reference Frame release, the IGS adopted a new antenna phase center model (igs08.atx) based on updated absolute calibrations of the ground antennas. Satellite antenna phase center offsets were readjusted to the ITRF2008 scale.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards.

Reprocessing Campaigns:

Results of the first IGS reprocessing campaign (Repro1) covering the period 1994-2007 were announced in April 2010 (see IGSMAIL-6136).  Repro1 results served as the IGS contribution to ITRF2008, and related product files have been finalized and distributed to the IGS Global Data Centers for access by users.  Details relating to the Repro1 Campaign are available online at http://acc.igs.org/reprocess.html.   A second reprocessing campaign (Repro2) has been initiated in 2012 to include updated procedures and data since Repro1.  Repro2 results will be used in the generation of ITRF2013.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards.

Multi-GNSS Global Experiment (M-GEX): 

A focused Multi-GNSS experiment was initiated by the GNSS Working Group.  M-GEX was developed to establish a data set of new GNSS signals, including the new GPS signals, new Russian GLONASS signals, the Japanese QZSS, the Chinese BeiDou, and the European Union’s Galileo, for experimentation. Participating stations are anticipated to eventually form the core of a multi-GNSS IGS network and service.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O1.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.2 Maintain/increase policy advisory role.

Real-time Pilot Project:

The strategy for an IGS real-time service has been developed with introduction of an initial service targeted by early 2013.  Real-time protocols and station standards have been developed by the Real-time Pilot Project participants working in cooperation with the Infrastructure Committee.  Standards for the real-time GNSS messages are being promoted in cooperation with the Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services, Subcommittee on Differential GNSS (RTCM-SC104), which is the principal international standards organization for real-time GNSS services.  There are 188 stations and 10 Analysis Centers participating in the Real Time Pilot Project.  Additionally, a GPS World article was published in June 2012.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O1.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.2 Maintain/increase policy advisory role.

Infrastructure Committee: 

The IGS has formed an Infrastructure Committee to focus on improving the network as well as data product and information delivery systems. 

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards.

Receiver Independent Exchange Format (RINEX) Working Group: 

A RINEX Working Group has been established to assume leadership in maintenance and further development of RINEX.  The group’s main tasks include working in cooperation with RTCM-SC104 to establish RINEX3 as a standard for new signals and GNSS systems; developing and implementing a transition plan to the new format as well as encouraging and supporting the development of open software tools for data handling and quality control. 

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O1.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.2 Maintain/increase policy advisory role.

Tide Gauge Working Group:

The TIGA project has transitioned from pilot phase to an official IGS product. 

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise.

Space Vehicle and Orbit Dynamics Working Group: 

The IGS has formed a new Satellite Orbit and Dynamics Working Group to develop improved satellite radiation pressure models.  These models are expected to improve the quality of the IGS orbit products. 

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise.

Bias and Calibration Working Group:

The IGS has formed a new Bias and Calibration Working Group to coordinate research related to bias retrieval, analysis and monitoring.  This Working Group is expected to develop procedures for consistent handling of biases between different GNSS receiver types and constellations.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise.

Troposphere Working Group:

The Troposphere product has transitioned from pilot phase to an official IGS product.  Daily zenith path delay estimates are being generated by the United States Naval Observatory with an approximate three-week latency for all active IGS sites based on Precise Point Positioning techniques. IGS Final Troposphere estimates are used by scientists worldwide to support climate-change and meteorological studies. 17.3 million Estimates files were downloaded in 2012 alone.

The goal of the Troposphere Working Group (TWG) is to improve the accuracy and usability of IGS troposphere estimates. The TWG goal for 2012-14 is to automate/publish comparisons of troposphere estimates obtained using independent methods including satellite geodesy, radio astronomy, and radiosondes. Coordination of IGS troposphere activities – including computation of IGS Final Troposphere Estimates and chairpersonship of the IGS TWG – was transferred in 2011 from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, California, USA) to the United States Naval Observatory (Washington, DC, USA).

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 IGS/GNSS integration; O1.4 GNSS standards, O1.5 Customers, O2.1 Technical expertise, O2.2 Policy making.

Combination Software:

Plans have been developed to update the IGS combination software jointly by the CODE and ESOC analysis centers together with TU Vienna.  This is the first major revision of this software since IGS began generating combination products in 1994. It is envisioned to allow for Multi-GNSS product combination and improve traceability of IGS products and maintainability of the software.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration.

Site Guidelines: 

IGS Site Guidelines have been continuously revised to reflect currently recommended best practices.  Guidelines were revised in 2012 to include procedures for upgrading station equipment, prescribing periods of operation where old and new equipment are operated simultaneously to assure that discontinuities are properly mapped as well as guidelines for real-time stations.  In 2009, stricter ground antenna requirements were added to the Guidelines, as recommended by the Antenna Working Group during the 2008 IGS Workshop.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards.

Radome Experiment:

An experiment to assess the effects of 21 IGS stations that are co-located with SLR or VLBI sites where radomes have not been calibrated to IGS standards has been initiated.  Station operators at many of these stations have removed radomes for a two-month period to generate a data set for experimentation.  Analysis is in progress. 

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards

Network Information Systems

IGS network information systems are in process of being upgraded to improve information content and consistency.  A prototype IGS network interface, which provides better access to station data and quality control (QC) information, is now operating.  Site log metadata are now contained in a relational database operating in parallel to the current site log system, which is facilitating improvements in site metadata accuracy and accessibility.  Network performance monitoring reports are being derived from metadata and quality control information that give an aggregate view of the network’s performance, including threshold compliance with IGS guidelines, data availability and quality parameters. 

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards

IGS Workshops:

Several IGS Workshops have been conducted since 2008:

Community Workshop, Miami, USA, 2008 (http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/IGSWorkshop2008/)
Community Workshop, Newcastle, UK, 2010 (http://www.igs.org/event/newcastle2010/)
TIGA Workshop, 2010
Bias and Calibration Workshop, Bern, Switzerland, 2012 (http://www.biasws2012.unibe.ch/)
Community Workshop, Olsztyn, Poland, 2012 (see: http://igs.org/presents/poland2012/)

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, 01.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise, O2.2 Maintain/increase policy advisory role, O3.1 Governance best practices, O3.2 Increase funding.

IGS Publications: 

A number of IGS publications have been produced since 2008, including:
IAG Travaux Reports, biennially
IGS Section of the IERS Annual Reports
Special IGS issue of the Journal of Geodesy: (see http://www.springerlink.com/content/0949-7714/83/3-4/)
White papers covering RINEX 2.12 and 3.01 were written in 2009
A Guide to Using IGS Products” was significantly updated in 2009 (see: http://igs.org/igscb/resource/pubs/UsingIGSProductsVer21.pdf)
IGS Technical Reports since 2011. ftp://igs.org/pub/resource/pubs/2011_techreport.pdf.
TIGA Paper Published in Journal of Geodesy (see http://acc.igs.org/trf/tiga_jog09.pdf)
Real-time Article Published in GPS World (see  http://bit.ly/RTgpsworld) June 2012
IGS Antenna Phase Center Corrections article published in GPS World Tech Talk Blog (see http://acc.igs.org/antennas/igs-pcvs_gpsworld10.pdf)
IGS08: the IGS realization of ITRF2008 (see http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10291-011-0248-2)

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O1.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise, O2.2 Maintain/increase policy advisory role, O3.1 Governance best practices, O3.2 Increase funding.

Compilation of Works Citing IGS:

Many papers, articles and presentations relating to IGS have been published or presented.  A partial listing of these is available online at http://tinyurl.com/IGS-bibli.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O1.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.1 Maintain/Increase expertise, O2.2 Maintain/increase policy advisory role, O3.1 Governance best practices, O3.2 Increase funding.

External Coordination and Outreach:

The IGS coordinates extensively with many external organizations to promote the IGS and develop key partnerships with participants and users:

Additionally, IGS has reached out to many user communities representing different regions and disciplines by participating in scientific workshops and conferences with presentations and chairing of sessions.  Examples of conference and workshops attended include:  AfricaGEO, the International Council of Science/World Data System (WDS), the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and European Geosciences Union (EGU), the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), the Asia Oceania Geosciences Society, the U.S. Institute of Navigation, the China Satellite Navigation Conference, the Colloquium on Scientific Applications of Galileo, among others.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O1.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise, O2.2 Maintain/increase policy advisory role, O3.1 Governance best practices, O3.2 Increase funding.

Terms of Reference: 

IGS Terms of Reference, the principal governing document of IGS, has been reviewed in detail and updated by the Governing Board.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O3.1 Governance best practices.

Working Group Charters and Membership: 

All Working Group charters and membership have been reviewed for relevancy and to assure the appropriate technical experts remain involved.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.1 Ensure/increase quality, O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise, O3.1 Governance best practices.

Associate Membership:

The process for selecting the IGS Associate Members has been reviewed and updated by the Governing Board, resulting in the formation of the Associate Membership Committee.  The constituency of Associate Members is reviewed annually.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise, O3.1 Governance best practices.

IGS Institute:

The IGS Institute was formed under the Central Bureau as a legal entity that is dedicated to furthering the IGS mission.  It is considered a charitable organization under US corporate law and thus pays no income tax per the public benefit provision of the US tax code (commonly known as a section 501(c)(3) exemption).  The IGS Institute provides a channel through which the IGS can conduct business that is not constrained by the policies or interests of any parent organization that may limit its effectiveness.

Objectives supported by this accomplishment: O1.2 Meet new user needs, O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS integration, O1.4 Generate/advocate GNSS standards, O1.5 Increase customer footprint, O2.1 Maintain/increase expertise, O2.2 Maintain/increase policy advisory role, O3.1 Governance best practices, O3.2 Increase funding.

 

Progress on Defined Actions

Through a Strategic Implementation Planning (SIP) process, the Governing Board specifies detailed actions, based on the actions defined in the Strategic Plan, that serve to steer IGS activities on an annual basis.  These are reviewed and evaluated annually, providing a subjective measure of performance.  An aggregated summary of the SIP evaluations is included in Appendix 1.  Our analysis of these shows that significant progress has been made in all but 5 of the 56 actions that were defined in the 2008-2012 Strategic Plan (Table 3). 

Impact of IGS Activities

This analysis considered the relevance of IGS activities to the organizational goals and objectives through an Achievement Impact Analysis that evaluates impact in three areas (see Appendix 2):

  • Impact of achievements.
  • Impact of ongoing activities.
  • Impact of the IGS components.

 Each accomplishment, ongoing activity and IGS component, collectively the IGS activities, was assigned a relevance rating that relates the activity to each of the IGS objectives, as follows:

  • Activity directly impacts objective
  • Activity indirectly impacts objective
  • Activity has minimal impact on objective

These relevance ratings provide a useful relative measure of the contributions made by the various IGS activities in achieving defined objectives.  In total, 76 IGS activities were evaluated.  A number of conclusions can be inferred:

All of the IGS activities evaluated are highly relevant to at least one of the IGS objectives.

These activities yielded significant impact (218 direct impacts and 278 indirect impacts) in achieving objectives.

Objectives most directly impacted by the IGS Activities include O1.1 Quality, O1.3 GNSS Integration, and O1.4 Standards.

Objectives most indirectly impacted by the IGS Activities include O1.4 Standards, O1.5 Increase Customer Footprint, O2.1 Expertise, and 02.2 Policy Advisory Role.

Objectives least impacted by the IGS Activities (i.e., those with most number of activities that have minimal impact) include O3.1 Best Practices, and O3.2 Funding.

The 33 accomplishments evaluated had relatively high impact on all objectives except those related to G3 Governance and Development.

Most of the 24 ongoing activities evaluated had a relatively high impact on all objectives except for 01.2 New user needs, and 03.2 Funding.

The 19 IGS components evaluated have relatively high impact on all objectives except those related to G3 Governance and Development.

Overall, the analysis shows that all of the IGS activities are highly relevant and address all of the defined objectives.  All activities also have a significant direct or indirect impact on the IGS objectives. IGS goals most impacted by the IGS Activities include G1 World Standard and G2 Expert Advisory Role, where the objectives relevant to achieving those goals are strongly supported by the IGS activities.  Least impacted is G3 Governance and Funding Development, where fewer of the IGS activities support the relevant objectives, suggesting that more future effort should be assigned in these areas.

 

Effectiveness in Achieving Goals and Objectives

Corresponding to each of the stated objectives, we have defined objective measures that may be used to assess effectiveness (Table 4).

     [Table 4: Objective targets and measurement of success]

 

O1.1 Ensure/Increase quality:

The principal measure of success is an improvement in the precision of the IGS core products.  Analysis results show that the precision of all of the core products has improved over the past five years. 

Result in achieving objective: success.

O1.2 Meet New User Needs:

The principal measure of success is an increase in the number of product downloads.  Examination of the Central Bureau access (ftp) logs shows an approximate 200% increase in the number of file downloads between 2008 and 2012.

Result in achieving objective: success.

O1.3 Maintain IGS/GNSS Integration:

The principal measure of success is an increase in IGS participation within various Earth observing programs and systems.  Since 2008, IGS has continued its participation within the World Data System (WDS), initiated participation in the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), and has continued engaging with the different GNSS providers through participation in the United Nations/International Committee on GNSS (ICG). 

Result in achieving objective: success.

O1.4 Generate/Advocate GNSS Standards:

The principal measure of success is adoption of IGS processes as recognized standards.  Since 2008, the IGS has:

Continued to contribute to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame, which is the de facto standard to which all Earth observations are referenced;

Developed and almost entirely revised the IGS Site Guidelines, which are highly referenced by GNSS users around the world.

Initiated participation within the Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services, Subcommittee on Differential GNSS Services (RTCM-SC104), the principal standards organization for real-time GNSS data for the maintenance and development of the RINEX format;

Developed real-time GNSS protocols that have been adopted by many organizations worldwide; and has compiled a new antenna phase center model which is used widely

Result in achieving objective: success.

O1.5 Increase Customer Footprint:

The principal measure of success is an increase in the number of IGS users.  The number of distinct visits to the Central Bureau ftp site is one indicator of the number of users, and has increased by approximately 300% between 2008 and 2012. 

Result in achieving objective: success.

O2.1 Maintain/Increase Expertise:

The principal measure of success is an increase in the number of publications that cite IGS.  The IGS bibliography shows an increase in number of publications that cite IGS during the 2008-2012 time frame over previous periods (see http://tinyurl.com/IGS-bibli). 

Result in achieving objective: success.

O2.2 Maintain/Increase Policy Advisory Role:

The principal measure of success is an increase in IGS participation within policy organizations.  Since 2008, the IGS has participated within the International Committee on GNSS (ICG) and within the United States National Positioning, Navigation and Timing  (PNT) Executive Advisory Committee.

Result in achieving objective: success.

O3.1 Governance and Best Practices:

The principal measure of success is an overall achievement of Strategic Plan objectives, as documented within this report. 

Result in achieving objective: success.

O3.2 Increase Funding:

The principal measure of success is an increase in funds available to IGS.  Since the IGS is not centrally funded, this cannot be measured directly.  However, an increase in the number of IGS participants, who fund their own participation, forms a useful proxy for this metric.  An examination of the IGS Associate Membership shows a growing number of participants within IGS. 

Result in achieving objective: success.

 

Conclusions

This report has highlighted many achievements the IGS has made in carrying out activities that support its defined actions.  The report has demonstrated that the IGS activities are relevant to the organizational objectives, and has objectively measured effectiveness in achieving objectives.  It is concluded from this analysis that the IGS has made significant progress in achieving its goals.  In particular the IGS goals of serving as the premier source of high-quality GNSS data, products and standards (G1), and promoting the value and benefit of IGS to society, the broader scientific community (G2) are well addressed by the IGS activities.  However, it was discovered through this analysis that more work is needed on objectives relating to Governance and Development (G3). It was also decided that all future Progress Reports will be written with the assistance of the outgoing Chair, so that he or she will be able to provide input and guidance throughout the entire writing process.

 

Appendix 1

Appendix 2

Appendix 3

 

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